If you’re following along from Part 1, we already know that JavaScript functions can be declared or expressed. We now know that functions must be called with() parameters, whether or not parameters have been included in our function. But there was also allusion to the option of calling functions without parameters. That’s where addEventListener() comes into play.

We’re going to use the same greeting() function as before, but this time we’re going to add it to a form, and when the form is submitted, we will get the greeting of the name that is submitted.

function greeting(name) { alert(`Hi ${name}!`)…


Not all data needs to go to a server.

If you are Amazon and you’re storing massive amounts of information in your server about each and every product you sell, do you really want to also store the information about each individual user’s preferences while visiting your site? Like say, what language they speak, whether the prefer light or dark mode, what they stored in their shopping cart but haven’t yet committed to purchasing, etc.? Probably not. The server is already busy handling transactions, shipping information, and more, it doesn’t need to be overloaded with these small pieces of information…


Functions in JavaScript are the most useful and also jumbling part of the language, in my humblest of opinions. Much like sentences in English, functions are the building blocks that make most websites, well, functional!

And much like English, I’ve had to dedicate some(*cough* a lot of) time and effort to fully understanding the rules and exceptions to functions in JavaScript. So I figured it’s time to help out my other friends who also aren’t so great with grammar, regardless of language!

What is a function?

The simplest way to define a function is that it is a means of defining some code that…


Building a new React project can be a little daunting when styling comes to mind. The concept of building a new app while simultaneously maintaining a solid aesthetic is no easy feat and it’s no wonder so many styling frameworks have popped up in response.

Material UI, Bootstrap, Semantic, are all incredibly popular and rightly so! However, if you are looking to build a beautifully streamlined app right off the bat, Chakra UI is a great place to start.

Before getting into all the tech stuff, it was created by Segun Adebayo who named it after Naruto. Honestly? Already sold.


Going into phase 4 of the Flatiron Coding Bootcamp, the process of going from “I don’t know what I don’t know” to “I know what I don’t know” is increasingly.. humbling every single day. As a person who genuinely enjoys the process of learning though, it’s also exciting. A good example of that is threads in programming. Now that me and my cohort members are more than halfway through our program, this concept of threads doesn’t just keep abstractly popping up, it’s a core part of our education. However, the thing about a bootcamp is that it’s hard to dig…


After the country shut down in March I was absolutely convinced, like many of us were, that the world was officially ending.

I lost my job, I wasn’t sure when I’d be going back to work, and no one knew what was happening from one day to the next. But by the time summer rolled around, I had worn myself out on drinking and wallowing in self-pity and was ready to tackle something new. Fast-forward to me being recommended Flatiron School, applying, doing 100 hours of pre-work, and getting started in class at the end of August!


In the few short weeks I’ve been at Flatiron School, if I’ve learned one singular thing about software engineering and development it’s that organization is imperative.

It’s not in my nature to think at such a functional level. I’m that person that has their head in the clouds and sees things on a grander scale, but can never find their keys or wallet. To say the learning curve has been steep is an…understatement. However that’s not to say it hasn’t happened! In a few weeks I’ve become pretty adept at setting myself a schedule (WILD) and keeping to it(EVEN WILDER!!)…

James Bond

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